Instagram

Film Festival Coverage: 11th Annual PHILADELPHIA ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL

Sunday, October 7, 2018


Tinsel & Tine's

COVERAGE OF

the

PHILADELPHIA ASIAN AMERICAN

FILM FESTIVAL 2018


By Le Anne Lindsay, Editor




Starting with our Signature 5 Question Interviews with several Filmmakers screening during #PAAFF18.

5 Question Interviews with BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL FILMMAKERS
5 Question Interviews with FIRSTGLANCE FILM FESTIVAL FILMMAKERS

5 QUESTION INTERVIEWS

with

PHILADELPHIA ASIAN AMERICAN

FILM FESTIVAL FILMMAKERS


NOTHING ON US: PINAYS RISING
Filmmaker & Producer: Ruby Ibarra & Evelyn Obamos
Screening Date: Sat. Nov 10th 1:15pm
TRAILER
Twitter | Twitter | Instagram | Instagram | Website

In NOTHING ON US: PINAYS RISING, Pinay Rapper Ruby Ibarra makes her directorial debut showing how she orchestrated an ambitious vision for her music video of “Us,” working through logistical nightmares and corralling a crowdsourced all-Pinay cast of 200 to create a multi-dimensional narrative. This documentary showcases the song’s global tropes of resistance and solidarity, serving as a Pinay anthem for women to continue rising.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Evelyn Obamos: Our film is centered around Bay Area-based Pinay rapper Ruby Ibarra's production process for her music video, Us. I've always been a fan of her music, so when I was put in touch with her for this project I was already super elated. I'll never forget when she said, "Women are often pit against each other, and here we have 200 pinays gathered to shoot this music video." It was a monumental moment, that continues to evolve as a movement. Of course I had to shoot this!

2.T&T: Was there a point where you almost didn't finish your film? And if so, what pushed you forward?

Evelyn: Ruby shot the music video in partnership with Burgundy Suites, and their target production date was International Women's Day in March. By February, a cast of over 150+ pinays were already sourced via social media on Ruby's twitter, facebook, and instagram handles. But we didn't have a venue. In fact, it wasn't until two days before the shoot that we finally confirmed all the shoot details, including costumes, a vintage car, and dancers. Like many things in our Filipino community, it took a village and all the music video footage was shot within two days.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at PAAFF18.

Evelyn: This video was made possible through a whole community effort. Shout outs to NPhared for the track music; Beatrock Music for producing the whole Circa 91 album; Dale Keano and Gordon Lim of Burgundy Suite; Freedom and Ate Allyson for hooking us up with a whole high school (Balboa High School) as our stage/playground; Volunteers from Pin@y Educational Partnership for helping the shoot dates flow smoothly; and all the pinays that were part of the video shoot! By now the music video is streaming all around the world and that effort was amplified through The Filipino Channel (s/o to Ginger and Bev), and then our documentary was invited to world premier at the Center for Asian American Media Film Festival in May. Our screening sold out and catapulted us into how we're on a film fest tour – Toronto, Boston, Guam, Atlanta, Paris, NYC to name a few.

4. T&T: This year's theme is music, tell us a bit about the music of your film? Or does food play a big part in your film? Or answer both.

Evelyn: Us is a call to action, for all women, brown women, our sisters. You don't have to be Filipino to relate to the track, because it draws from global tropes of resistance and solidarity. What you see in the documentary short are women who are multi-dimensional and unapologetic.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 11th Annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival ?

Evelyn: Screening at PAAFF means amplifying our message, beating the drum even louder, and reaching more folks to talk about representation of Pinays on the big screen.


REVOLUTION SELFIE; The Red Battalion
Filmmaker: Steven De Castro
Screening Date: Sat Nov 17th 12:45pm
120 mins | Documentary | Philippines | English

Revolution Selfe expands the horizons of documentarystorytelling while broadening our understanding about the lesser-known fronts in the global “War on Terror.” Filmmaker Steven De Castro paints a portrait of a 48 year-old Maoist guerilla army in the Philippine hinterlands known as the New People's Army. But rather than simply presenting interviews and images in a traditional journalistic manner, this flm weaves fantasy elements and web-based camera techniques into the documentary form to disrupt our entire matrix of widely held beliefs underpinning the discussion of terrorism, poverty, and the motivations of the warriors who fght in a peasant revolution.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Steven de Castro: Throughout our lives, Filipinos like myself have always heard about this armed guerilla group called the NPA or New People's Army, and sometimes they would be looked at as heroes against a corrupt government, and sometimes they would be portrayed as terrorists. So it started as a curiosity that turned into a passion. I decided to see for myself, not just by meeting with them, but living with them for a couple of months.

2.T&T: Was there a point where you almost didn't finish your film? And if so, what pushed you forward?

Steven: In a war there is always the possibility that you won't finish your film, because obviously you might not make it back. But it turned out that the greatest risk to the film, and to life and limb, was riding on the backs of motorcycles as they were flying down muddy mountain roads at high speed.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at PAAFF18.

Steven: My wife Rose was a great help to me as always, but also to the warriors of the Pulang Bagani Battalion who were incredibly hospitable and some of whom even risked their lives bringing me into the combat zone to allow me to make this movie.

4. T&T: This year's theme is music, tell us a bit about the music of your film? Or does food play a big part in your film? Or answer both.

Steven: The music of Revolution Selfie was made by the activists who are part of the liberation movement in the Philippines, and it includes the music of Danny Fabella, a Philippine folks singer who is the hopeful voice of his generation. We also have a cameo by Nejma Nefertiti, an incredible revolutionary hip hop emcee from New York City, one of the greatest women in hip hop today.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 11th Annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival ?

Steven: HUGE. I love screening at PAAFF because they demonstrate the most creativity of any of the film festivals of the Asian American circuit, and they are the best organized. They do the best job of any festival in matching each program with the right audience, and that is very important for a film like Revolution Selfie, which is an avant garde documentary/fantasy film that has to find the right audience.

MONSTER ME
Filmmaker: Yeon Jin Kim
Screening Date: Thurs Nov 15th 5:00pm
Website

An ancient monster emerges from the “Old Faithful” geyser at Yellowstone, attacking an artist doing a residency and wreaking havoc in Jackson Hole. Shot from miniature hand-made paper and cardboard models and sets combined with video sequences, the monster, Satyrius Marinus, from a seventeenth century engraving, comes back to life and bursts from an “Old Faithful” calendar image, surprising a tour bus full of Asian tourists among others. An innocent artist is accosted while taking a shower by this terrifying beast with a wicked sense of humor, as Donald Trump`s victory speech plays on her laptop.

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Yeon Jin Kim: One day I was taking a shower at home and the bathroom door popped open by itself, which scared the heck out of me. The door opened because the apartment is very old and nothing works well, but it caused me to imagine being attacked in the bathroom and eaten by a monster. A short time later I was invited to do a residency at the Teton Artlab in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. I decided to use this opportunity to develop this experience into a monster movie using the environment of Jackson Hole and the landscapes of Yellowstone National Park.

I was also influenced by a Korean folk tale about a nine-tailed fox who wanted to become a person. In order to become a human, she needed to seduce one hundred men and eat their livers. She was successful with ninety nine but failed with the last man. It occured to me that this tale is reflective of the situation of people trying to assimilate into a society from which they are excluded.

I was also influenced by the election of Donald Trump to the American presidency which was happening at that time.

2.T&T: Was there a point where you almost didn't finish your film? And if so, what pushed you forward?

Yeon Jin:I had wonderful help from a few professionals but 80% of the production and post-production was done by myself. It is always challenging to build the energy to start a film and to maintain it to finish the project. My artist friends always help me with my projects.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at PAAFF18.

Yeon Jin: Eunsun Choi, my friend and motion graphic designer was extremely helpful. She did most of the morphing and taught me a lot of special effect skills. Minah Kim, who is a graphic designer was also very capable and helpful. These two artists were also great advisers and consultants. They always came up with great answers to my questions and doubts. Carlos Lopez and Joel Carreiro, who did the voice-over, added real comedy to the film. Quentin Chiappetta, a wonderful sound engineer, designed the sound which added more excitement to the film.

4. T&T: This year's theme is music, tell us a bit about the music of your film? Or does food play a big part in your film? Or answer both.

Yeon Jin: The music at the end was Mark Twang and The Nervous Fellows, suggested by Quentin and perfect for the film.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 11th Annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival ?

Yeon Jin: I was trained as a sculptor and interdisciplinary artist, not as a filmmaker. I have always been interested in making stories and sharing with an audience. I have found the film community very open to my work. The opportunity to participate in Film Festivals like PAAFF provides me an audience for my work, inclusion in a creative community and encouragement to continue with my projects.


LIVING IN THE STORY
Director: Lynn Estomin
Screening Date: Thurs. Nov 15th 6:30pm
TRAILER
Website
Living in the Story documents thirty-five years of art making by the distinguished photographic artist Patrick Ryoichi Nagatani, one of the most brilliant photographic artists of our era. In the late 1970s, he pioneered the Contemporary Constructed Photographic Movement in Los Angeles, developing a new visual vocabulary by constructing tableau photographs from sets, sculptures, models, and paintings. The film portrays an artist deeply concerned and well informed about world events who uses imagery, storytelling and narrative fiction to raise awareness about modern anxieties, with an emphasis on the threat of nuclear weapons technology. Nagatani has also explored healing techniques and states of consciousness in which the material world is transcended. Despite the serious content of his subject matter, his innovative images are compelling and entertaining. An engaging raconteur and teacher, Nagatani talks in the film about his projects, his unorthodox photographic techniques, and his subtle weaving together of fiction and fact. Scott Nagatani’s hauntingly beautiful music score provides the film’s soundtrack.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Lynn Estomin: Patrick. Nangatani, the subject of the film was my main inspiration. Over twenty years ago, I had the privilege of meeting and becoming friends with him, a truly exceptional artist, activist and storyteller. Patrick was an amazing mentor to me. His enthusiasm for life and photography and his innovative approach to combining storytelling, history, politics, identity, community and multiple mediums into seamless images greatly influenced my own approach to creating art on political and cultural issues.

2.T&T: Was there a point where you almost didn't finish your film? And if so, what pushed you forward?

Lynn: I was honored and humbled to be invited to collaborate on a film about Patrick Nagatani's life and work. I say collaborate because film making is always a collaborative process; but also, because Patrick was very much a partner in shaping this film. In a perfect world, I would have interviewed Patrick telling his stories as he created his fantastical sets and built his intricate models, but by the time I joined this project, he was too ill (stage four cancer with over 70 chemo treatments) to work in the studio anymore. So, the film is constructed primarily from archival footage I was able to locate, his artwork and over 20 hours of interviews from the Andrew Smith Gallery’s Legacy Project. The interviews were not done with a broad audience in mind, so this was a big challenge, as was the fact that I was racing the clock so Patrick could be involved in the editorial decisions and see the final cut. Plus, the diversity of his projects made it difficult to devlop a cohesive script. Finding a way to tie the work together cinematically and conceptually was challenging. What pushed me forward was an intense desire to introduce this innovative artist to a broad audience and to let him tell future viewers of his work what he was trying to achieve.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at PAAFF18.

Lynn: Andrew Smith (Producer) and Miguel Gandert (Cinematographer) had the idea to film Patrick talking about his work for academic researchers while he was still able to be interviewed. They realized there was a potential to reach a broader audience and asked me to join the project. Patrick Nagatani (Producer) collaborated on the structuring of the film and provided access to his though patterns and all his artwork. Patrick’s brother, Scott Nagatani (Composer and Music Producer), created a hauntingly intimate score for the film.­

4. T&T: This year's theme is music, tell us a bit about the music of your film? Or does food play a big part in your film? Or answer both.

Lynn: Scott Nagatani’s music score magically captures the nuances and diversity of his brother’s prolific work. Because Scott interacted closely with Patrick at each stage of his 30+ year career, as he was creating each of his varied series of innovative photographic work, Scott had an inside track to Patrick’s creative process, and that intimacy is reflected in the haunting and beautiful soundtrack Scott created as his final tribute to an older brother he loved and admired artistically. Patrick Nagatani often used food as a vehicle for humor and irony in his elaborate photographic tableaus. For instance, in on one image he has his extended family of Japanese Americans (whose parents and grandparents were interned during WWII) at a picnic at a atom bomb testing site, wearing kimonos and eating sushi with chopsticks, while an atomic blast reflects in their sunglasses.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 11th Annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival ?

Lynn: It is a great honor to have my film chosen to screen at PAAFF. Patrick and his brothers were activists involved in getting permanent markers installed at the Japanese Internment camps to honor those who were detained and as a warning and history lesson for future generations. I believe screening this film now – when anti-immigrant sentiments are high and history could repeat itself – is important.

Come Back For More Filmmaker Q&A's To Be Posted Soon!

Original post: I attended the preview party for The 2018 11th Annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival, presented by Comcast and held at Saigon Maxim Restaurant in South Philly. This year's festival will run November 8-18, 2018 and feature over 80 films, the festival will include intimate discussions with filmmakers; celebrity chef catering;musical concerts; live theater performances by local Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) artists; and more!


Music is central to many of the major titles at this year’s Festival, which will also highlight the lack of Asian Americans in the music industry through a musical film showcase, weekend-long academic conference on the Music of Asian America:

TRADITIONAL & HIP HOP - Friday 11/9 at Lightbox Film Center In this showcase we will be exploring the connections between traditional and contemporary, showing how the lineage of musical practice within multiple generations of diasporic communities has helped create innovative approaches to the wholly American genre of hip hop.

FOLK & INDIE - Saturday 11/10 at Lightbox Film Center The lineup includes Americana story songs to Filipino folk traditions, and an American-born Korean making music in return diaspora. Each of these acts deal with questions of authenticity, ancestral memory, and preserving the legacies of those who came before.


The Opening Night Film (Thursday, Nov. 8th 7PM) is the East Coast Premiere of IN THE LIFE OF MUSIC which tells the story of how one song made famous by Sinn Sisamouth (the King of Khmer Music) plays a role in the lives of three different generations. Told in three chapters during three different decades, this touching drama depicts the lives of people whose world was inevitably transformed by the emergence of the Khmer Rouge Regime. Director Caylee So and other members of the cast & crew are expected in attendance for a Q&A, followed by a reception catered by a local Cambodian American chef.

Speaking of which, music and film do go hand and hand, but as this is Tinsel & Tine, it's food and film we celebrate! Mark your Calendars for FILIPINO FOOD SUNDAY Nov. 11th at Reading Terminal Market After a free screening of Discovery Asia documentary series PRISON FOOD, several market vendors will be adding limited quantities of Filipino dishes to their menus for one-day-only as part of our Filipino Food Sunday event. Vendors confirmed to date include Sang Kee (Seafood Palabok) and Flying Monkey Bakery (Ube Cupcakes).

And Centerpiece Documentary ULAM: MAIN DISH at Lightbox Film Center

In this delicious new documentary, Filipino-American filmmaker Alexandra Cuerdo follows the rise of Filipino food via the award-winning chefs who are crossing over to the center of the American table.

Ulam: Main Dish stages this new culinary movement as not only a remarkable achievement for American restaurateurs but also as a validation of Filipino culture. The film confronts issues inherent in representing both Filipino and American identity as well as challenges from both the Filipino community and the world at large. Ultimately, Ulam is a celebration—and confirmation—that Filipino food and Filipinos are here to stay. Director Alexandra Cuerdo expected in attendance for a post film Q&A followed by a catered reception featuring Filipino food.

Philadelphia Asian Film and Food Festival Nov 11

See the Full Line Up of Films and Events - PAAFF'18 PROGRAM GUIDE 

See this year's FESTIVAL TRAILER


Share :)




click to
COMMENT

Philly Events Calendar

ADD YOUR EVENT for FREE! - which includes SOCIAL MEDIA BLASTS!
tinseltine@gmail.com  Click AGENDA VIEW to see complete list of happenings.


Featured Post

26th Annual PHILADELPHIA FILM FESTIVAL Coverage (Oct 19-29, 2017)

Tinsel & Tine's Look at : The 26th Annual PHILADELPHIA Film Festival By Le Anne Lindsay, Editor POST UPDATE #PFF26 DAY 1...

Food n Film: BURNT

Food n Film: BURNT
Bradley Cooper has more than charisma, he has an over abundance of Chi, which radiates out from him; so for me, this role as temperamental and damaged chef Adam Jones, who also inspires great love and admiration from those around him, works on the level of characterization. In fact, I think he's among a very short list of actors who would be able to pull off being so self-involved and yet likable. Doesn't hurt that he really speaks French too! READ POST

Food n Film: CHEF

Food n Film: CHEF
Much of the movie centers around the father/son relationship, and how much they learn from each other. But the real star of the film is all the food preparation, every other scene made me groan with want of everything up on that screen! Particularly the perfectly roasted and rubbed brisket, the crispy fat of the pork belly, sizzling bacon and the much ballyhooed Chocolate Lava Cake. READ POST

CITY OF GOLD

CITY OF GOLD
The key to deciphering both the city it beautifully depicts and the man who eats it best - City of Gold


By Tinsel & Tine Contributor Denine Gorniak (The Bicycle-Chef)

What Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times food critic/writer, has done for food writing journalism and for the restaurants that he loves, the movie, City of Gold has done for Jonathan Gold and Los Angeles and its surrounding environs – it has planted taco covered kisses on them... READ POST

Food n Film: CHOCOLAT

Food n Film: CHOCOLAT
If you’re a foodie movie lover who saw Lasse Hallström’s The Hundred Foot Journey (see T&T post), this summer you may be wondering what delicious visual journey might be awaiting you in the theater next. Well, how about a look back at his film Chocolat (2000), which stars French actress Juliette Binoche, Judi Dench and Johnny Depp. Hallström’s has a special talent for turning cooking into a dramatic movie journey...READ MORE

Food n Film: THE HUNDRED FOOT JOURNEY

...young Hassan, a soulful-eyed boy with lush, thick eye lashes, places his face into the sea urchin basket, and breathes in the exotic briny scent. He sticks his fingers into the aquatic ooze, takes it to his mouth and is transfixed by the taste. The vendor, oblivious to the thrusting arms of frenzied women, notices the boy and realizes he is the only one worthy of this oceanic prize; he is the one who can “truly taste.” ... READ MORE

Food n Film: JULIE & JULIA

Food n Film: JULIE & JULIA
Personally, I like the unevenness of it, because I fell in love with the post World War II, Parisian sights, sounds, food and romance between Julia and Paul. I always felt a bit jarred back into reality when the scenes returned to Julie's meltdowns and cramped kitchen.READ POST

Food n Film: EAT PRAY LOVE

Food n Film: EAT PRAY LOVE
Six months into my 38th year of this life, I had my first panic attack. I didn't know that's what it was until months later. Symptom after symptom starting piling up on me until there were days I could no longer move my arms or neck. The doctors told me I was suffering from an auto-immune condition that they felt was most likely Lupus. And so began my much deeper journey and exploration into the world of spirit, alternative medicine, yoga, meditation and Eat, Pray, Love. READ POST

Food n Film: TODAY'S SPECIAL

Food n Film: TODAY'S SPECIAL
With a film like this, food plays a main character in the story and I was lucky enough to get an interview with the film's Food Stylist, Janine Kalesis.READ POST

Food n Film: WAITRESS

Food n Film: WAITRESS
In this 2007 film, Keri Russell stars as Jenna - a desolate diner waitress seeking solace in the art of pie-making. Trapped in an unhappy marriage, she’s eager to escape her husband and her small-town hell and sets about to make a run for it by entering an out of town pie baking contest. READ POST

Food n Film: BABETTE'S FEAST

Food n Film: BABETTE'S FEAST
Those of us in attendance were not only given the opportunity to see Babette's Feast, the Oscar winning, Danish film, considered one of the all-time great "food films"; we also got to taste Babette's menu! READ POST

WALKMS

I participated in WalkMS Philly on 4/30/16
Thank you to the readers who donated to the cause - It's not too late to support! Click badge below

15 Top Food in Film Flicks

15 Top Food in Film Flicks
Cozy Quilt of Food Movies, we'll add more patches as T &T discovers more films where food plays the biggest "roll"

Tinsel & Tine on Paper.li

Tinsel & Tine on Paper.li
Really love this platform, you feature your stuff and other people's stuff you follow, and it all configures like the front page of a newspaper. Click to see what I mean

Visit Our YouTube Channel

Visit Our YouTube Channel
View Q & A's with visiting Filmmakers to Philly

Philly Food and Film

Videographer Oliver Gallini 5 min short featuring organic-chemist-turned-chef, Townsend Wentz, who got his start at The Four Seasons Philadelphia.

IRON MAN BIONICS

Cross Content Blogs

LAMB

Large Association of Movie Blogs

Tinsel & Tine was nominated for a VBA

bloglovin

bloglovin

group of 10,000 women bloggers dedicated to supporting one another by leaving comments

Women Online

The Blogstress Network

The Blogstress Network
Female Bloggers Unite

Contributor from 2010 - 2012

About This Blog

is about discovering what I find pleasing in screening & eating - in case you missed it, the name is a play on Tinseltown using the Tines of a Fork.

Feel free to send me info on a film or new restaurant you'd like me to highlight.
-tinseltine@gmail.com


Will there ever be a cap on movie prices?

Will we one day pay $20 a pop?

Why don't we pay on a scale?

A crap movie like everything Adam Sandler has ever done should cost about $4.50.
Big action movies like"Lord of the Rings", "Iron Man," "Transformers" are worth $10.
Woody Allen movie or something like "Silver Linings Playbook" $6-$7.
A chick flick or light comedy $5.75 and most Indie Films $5.25.

You could even do it by seasons - all summer block busters from May to August - $10
Sept - November 15th $3.50 - $4
Back to $10 for Thanksgiving and Christmas etc...

Or you can do it by A Actors ($9 - $10), B Actors ($6 - $7) TV actors on the big screen ($3.50 - $4)

Surely I'm not the first person to realize this makes sense. Has it been voted on in the Motion Picture Industry and then vetoed? If so, why?

Camera Tips

Followers

  © Blogger template On The Road by Ourblogtemplates.com 2009

Back to TOP