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BLACKSTAR Film Festival Interviews with Filmmakers 2018

Sunday, July 29, 2018

Tinsel & Tine's

5 QUESTION INTERVIEWS

with

BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL FILMMAKERS


By Le Anne Lindsay, Editor




Post Update 8.15.18 Compilation of Post Screening Q&A from the filmmakers

 
The 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival in Philadelphia gets underway shortly (August 2-5, 2018). To further shine a spotlight on the talented filmmakers screening this year, I asked several of the directors and/or writers in the shorts programs to answer the same 5 Questions, which resulted in varying and personal responses.   Please see filmmakers answers below:

BEHIND THE DOOR: JOLA'S STORY
Director Michael Adeyeye
Writer Chioma C Ezeh
When World's Collide Shorts Program
Friday, Aug. 3rd 4:05pm
United Kingdom, 2017, 9 min.
North America Premiere

A story of loss, struggle and liberation. Jola, who was trafficked from her home country of Nigeria when she was a child, has spent the last decade being transported across different countries and cities. We begin to unravel the pieces of her individual story and her journey towards liberation. TRAILER
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Chioma C Ezeh: I think its important that the work I create is not only visually captivating but also improves peoples lives in some way and I feel honored that I was able to achieve this through BTD, as the writer and lead actress, it was crucial that the director and I shared a common understanding as to what we envisioned this film to be, and I think that's definitely been one of the great successes of this film - the fact that we were all so invested in Jola’s story and the possibility that this film could inform & add to the conversations surrounding Modern Day Slavery.

2.T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Chioma C Ezeh: As a filmmaker, I would say the place I really shine is when it comes to the “untold story” or when I get a chance to challenge or inform narratives.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Chioma C Ezeh: Of course a massive shout out has to go out to our Indiegogo supporters, and to my team, particularly our incredibly talented and supportive Producer Earleatha Oppon who has been with me from the very beginning and helped us get to BSFF! Our Director Michael Adeyeye, Costume designer Elleshia Flowers, our amazing actors Kingsley Amadi, Guy Samuels, Melanie Gayle and Clara Rose and Louise Davidson who supported this journey from its inception.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Chioma C Ezeh: We actually had a food scene where one of the characters brings Jola this plate of unpleasant food which didn’t make it to the final cut (we’ve since included it in our production diary which can be found here http://btdfilm.com/productiondiary.html ) and the idea here was really to further illustrate her way of life. Other than that, I remember after one of the scenes we were moving onto our final location, and we all eating and just talking really and suddenly that's when it all felt real for me that this vision was actually coming to life.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Chioma C Ezeh: It means so much to have been selected, to be included in a line up that celebrates Black Art and conversations in this way truly is an honor.


 CAL & V
Director Timothy Offor 
Possibly, Maybe Shorts Program
Saturday, Aug. 4, 12:00 noon 
United States, 2017, 13 min.

(Philadelphia Premiere) Shot primarily in one take, this film depicts a moment in the lives of two former lovers. Cal Reese, a movie star, fresh off a career comeback, returns to the old neighborhood in order to reclaim his one true love, Vanessa. To his surprise, Vanessa resists his advances, protecting her heart from another abandonment. Cal persists as they stroll down memory lane, deflecting the dissenting opinions of old friends and concerned neighbors. When they can go no further, Vanessa must decide whether the depths of old wounds run deeper than the waters of forgiveness.
Click for Trailer
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Timothy Offor: The main inspiration for my film was watching my friends and even in my own experience as I transitioned from my late 20s into my early 30s navigate love and our relationships, specifically the ones that never seem to end.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Timothy Offor: I think I shine most at being able to deliver extraordinary emotions out of relatively ordinary circumstances. I was once told by a professor in undergrad that everyone is interesting. Therefore, when I see the ordinary things we go through in life, I look at it throw a cinematic lens and I am able to dramatize them and make them captivate you as you view. I believe this works because I relate to my work so much and I feel if I make it as it is relatable to me as I do to my cast and crew then that will translate to the viewers.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Timothy Offor: Big shout out to my entire cast and crew. Especially our lead producers Ian McClellan and Jheanelle Brown who were on the project long before and way after anyone else. I also want to thank professor USC Jed Dannenbaum who pulled me into his office and encouraged me to make this film with this style when I was at one of my lowest moments. USC Professor Richard Burton for mentoring me throughout the process. Also my aunts Mel, Jenny and Wendy who donated to us in order to make this film happen.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Timothy Offor: Although no food was eaten on screen, the entire cast and crew enjoyed a Trinidadian inspired spread for lunch, catered by my Aunt Debbie. Over a year later I'm still getting requests from crew members for her food.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Timothy Offor: It's an honor and truly appreciated to be a part of the 7th annual Blackstar film festival. This film has played at many festivals and obviously I haven't been able to attend all but I knew I would make this one work. I have a black & brown love story, I don't think that is often seen on screen, at least not with the approach we took. Blackstar is the place that is giving filmmakers like myself the opportunity to showcase our work without bias and for that I am grateful.

RECURRENCE PLOT: THE FAMILY CIRCLE
Director Bryan Oliver Green
Future Frontier Shorts Program Friday, Aug. 3, 12:00 noon
United States, 2018, 14 min.
A crystal, memory-storing bracelet transports a young mother back to the day of her own mother’s traumatic death and challenges the notion that time flows in only one direction.
World Premiere.

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Bryan Oliver Green: "Recurrence Plot: The Family Circle" is a film adaptation of the first chapter of Rasheedah Phillip's self-published novel "Recurrence Plot And Other Time Travel Tales". So clearly, the main inspiration for my film would be Rasheedah Phillips and her work. It was an amazing experience to finally collaborate artistically with such a good friend. Essentially, "The Family Circle" is a story about trauma, breaking cycles of destruction, and the struggle of modern black womanhood. It acts as a prologue and sets up the personal history/background story of Khepri, who becomes the main character for the rest of the novel "Recurrence Plot".

2.T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Bryan Oliver Green: As a filmmaker I shine most as a writer, director & editor. I adapted Rasheedah's work directly from the page in a way that best-served her story and her vision. As a director, I am very adept at pulling stellar performances from child actors and even individuals with little-to-no acting experience. One of my golden rules about directing is that it's typically better to tell an actor what their character feels and why, rather than simply telling an actor what to say or do.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Bryan Oliver Green: I had the absolute best team assembled for this project! Kevin Martin, another long-term collaborator, was my Director of Photography [he also DPed on my comedy "The Philadelphia Bicycle Vignette Story" nominated for best narrative short in BlackStar last year] he shot everything beautifully and really brought our vision to life! Sara Zia Ebrahimi was indispensable as a producer and AD, assisting me with the fundraising process. Derrick Woodyard wore so many hats and came with so much of his personal equipment on this production! He assisted Kevin as AC and gripped/gaffed for us as well.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Bryan Oliver Green: I also had a very dear friend of mine, Nia D. Minard [Imbitecurious Catering] provide meals for us for all three days. We graduated from Drexel together, and I've been a devoted fan of her cooking for nearly 15 years now haha It's great to be able to hire her professionally as the two of us progress in our respective careers over the years.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Bryan Oliver Green: Screening "Recurrence Plot" at BlackStar this year means more to me than I could possibly verbalize! I love the fact that I've been given the opportunity to screen at BlackStar two years in a row with two very dynamically different films [a comedy and a sci-fi drama] showcasing my range as a filmmaker & storyteller. I also love the fact that I announced my intention to put "Recurrence Plot" together last year at BlackStar in the Q&A following my screening of The Bicycle Vignettes, and exactly a year later it has become a reality!


FOUR DAYS IN MAY 
Director Deborah A. Thomas, Junior “Gabu“ Wedderburn, Deanne M. Bell
August 2nd 1:15pm (Screens before Douvan Jou Ka Leve)
United States, 2017, 41 min.
Four Days in May explores how state violence generates archives of both suffering and life by focusing on the 2010 State of Emergency in West Kingston, Jamaica. Locally dubbed the “Tivoli Incursion,” the joint operation of the military and police forces into Tivoli Gardens and surrounding communities in order to apprehend Christopher “Dudus” Coke, who had been ordered for extradition to the United States to stand trial for gun and drug-related charges, resulted in the deaths of at least 75 civilians. The film features community residents talking about their experiences during the “incursion,” and naming and memorializing of loved ones they lost.
Click for Video of Thomas
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Deborah Thomas:To our minds, there wasn't enough attention being paid to the ongoing issues related to the Tivoli Incursion in Jamaica, and people's stories weren't being heard. It was too easy for Jamaicans to dismiss what happened as something that was in the past and something that had to happen to change the political system, but then they weren't addressing the victims of the incursion as full humans beings. The film was meant to add depth to the media reports that were dominating people's understanding of the incursion.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Deborah Thomas: I am, first and foremost, an anthropologist, and I am interested in the ways we can represent social worlds outside of books and academic audiences. Before I became an anthropologist, I was a professional dancer, and so always believed in the power of art to change people's thinking and hearts. As a filmmaker, I am committed to telling complex stories without offering easy solutions to problems, which is also the strength of anthropology.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Deborah Thomas:Of course, my co-directors Deanne M. Bell and Junior "Gabu" Wedderburn are amazing, as are the many many people who helped make this film happen, in Jamaica and in the US.
4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Deborah Thomas:Food? Lots of discussions over curried conch at Moby Dick's, my favorite restaurant in downtown Kingston.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Deborah Thomas: We're so excited to be part of Black Star's seventh year, in part because our earlier film, BAD FRIDAY, was in the first Black Star festival. We're honored to be able to return!!

ACCIDENTALS
filmmaker Aisha Evelyna
Family Matters Shorts Program
Thurs. August 2nd 11am
Canada, 2017, 12 min. (U.S. Premiere)
An estranged father and daughter come to terms with their frayed relationship during a tense road trip as they each limp towards the realization that neither of them is doing okay on their own.
Click for TRAILER

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Aisha Evelyna: A little bit of August Wilson’s Fences and a LOT of Scandal. Yes, Shonda Rhimes’s “Scandal"- and the lack of father daughter relationships on screen- specifically with regards to black familial relationships that exist outside the crack head narrative, that are NOT comedy.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Aisha Evelyna: Not a director! (at least I don’t consider myself one right now lol) Where I hope I shine as a filmmaker is as an actor on screen. However, I plan on putting on a director hat for my next short film, Shoegazer, which I will also star in, because Shonda hasn’t made me a serious offer yet.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Aisha Evelyna: Shout out to my Director and Best bud - Natalie Novak, Producer Magician Mother Greatness- Elizabeth Fraser, Powerhouse Kevin Hanchard, Annie Fairfoul at We Make Movies Canada, John Marcucci for sitting through 10 awful first drafts, Farid Yazdani, Y.E.A.A, & ACTRA Toronto, & my mom for listening to me cry when making a movie was a wee bit too much for me to handle.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Aisha Evelyna: There are a lot of “Tim Bits” (donut holes) eaten while shooting this short. They were all eaten by me, and I loved every second of it. The next day- not so much.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Aisha Evelyna:Everything. The fact that people continue to find any kind of artistic merit in this film still continues to leave me incredibly humbled and in awe. Grateful is not a big enough word.

JUNIOR
Director Tarik Jackson
Family Matters Shorts Program
Thurs. August 2nd 11am
United States, 2017, 9 min.
A young black boy wakes up to a noise in the middle of the night. It is an attempted robbery at their comfortable, middle class home that gets thwarted by his father who has a gun. The police arrive and their investigation causes tension. Later, after a fishing trip, their car is pulled over by hostile police who think the dad is a criminal.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Tarik Jackson: The project came together as a part of the feature film shot (available on DVD right now) directed by film school professor and mentor Jeremy Kagan. Kagan wanted to make a small project about how gun violence has affected black communities and reach out to me about making it happen. As soon as I heard about the project I instantly thought of the first time a gun was pointed at me. It was when my Dad and I were pulled over by two cops when I was 8 years old.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Tarik Jackson: I shine in a lot of areas lol. If I had to choose one it’d be working with actors, I really feel comfortable conversing with them and pushing them to the height of their creativity. I’m also really big on framing shots but I always make sure to work with a super talented DP who can expand my visual vision.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Tarik Jackson: First out shout out the best producer in Jacquin DeLeon who almost died twice putting this film together. My co writer Salim Lemelle who really helped me shape the story we were telling and make it feel as real as possible. My cousin/brother and DP Elijah Karriem who pulled off the best oner of my career in the opening scene. A’sia Horne who had to sit in session after session of our ridiculous notes for the edit. AJ Gannon who did all the post sound in his new in home studio. Jognic Bontemps who gave us an original 90’s sitcom style score. Actually I use some of the music he created as the theme song for my daily show TLDR on Mel Magazine. And last but not least the man who paid the bills Jeremy Kagan. (Tarik & Salim are also writers on the Web Series Melvin Gregg Presents Class)

 
4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Tarik Jackson: Nah not really. We ate when we were hungry.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Tarik Jackson: I’m amped for it. Some great filmmakers I came up with like Tim Offor (see interview above) and Chris Ortega are also screening in the fest so I’m excited to see their films play with the new crowd. And I love Philly, so having a reason to come to the city of Brotherly Love is always a blessing. This the second time I’ll be in Philly this year, I was out here a few months ago to visit my boy Steve Caple while he directed Creed 2, so to be back with my own film is dope AF.

ZENITH
Director Ellie Foumbi
When Worlds Collide Shorts Program
Friday, August 3rd 4:05pm
United States, 2017, 15 min.
North America Premiere

When an adopted Black Mennonite has an unexpected connection with a migrant worker, she is torn between her faith and her desire to explore the outside world.
www.elliefoumbi.com
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Ellie Foumbi: I was inspired by an article I found about an African-American woman who was adopted into a rural Mennonite community as a baby. I saw direct parallels with my own upbringing when I first moved from Africa to the U.S. and attended a French school where there were relatively no other students of color. It was quite a culture shock for me. I struggled to find my place in this new society. With Zenith, I saw an opportunity to examine identity through the lens of race and family. I was also really interested in exploring the world of Mennonites, a community rarely depicted on screen.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Ellie Foumbi: I’ve been a cinephile since the age of five. I fell in love with the films of Claire Denis, Michael Haneke and Lynne Ramsey, among others. Visually, I’ve spent the last several years developing my eye as a director at Columbia University’s School of the Arts where my style has evolved immensely. My experience as an actor has also given me a lot of confidence when it comes to directing actors. I’m not afraid to throw away my script and to find new interesting moments through improvised work with the actors. I think that’s one of my strongest attributes as a director.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Ellie Foumbi: I had the most incredible team, starting with my cinematographer, Charlotte Dupré who was one of the first crew members to join the project. Our collaboration was one of a kind. I also need to credit the incredible producing team we had, which includes Sola Fasehun and Joseph Mastantuono. They each contributed very differently to this film. The cast was one of the best, I’ve ever worked with: Rudy Mungaray, Benton Green and Michelle Macau. Finally, I have to shoutout my editor, Dan Gross and my composer, Gavin Brivik. I was awarded a film scoring grant from ASCAP, which gave Gavin and I the resources to create a very unique score. This really helped elevate the film to another level.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Ellie Foumbi: Sadly, food did not play a part in our film. The entire film was shot in a house in upstate, NY.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Ellie Foumbi: It means everything. Up to date, the film has screened solely at international film festivals like BOGO Shorts and Zanzibar International Film Festival. It feels really good to bring it back to the States as this is our U.S. premiere. I’ve heard really good things about BlackStar for years and had many friends screen here. My team and I are honored to have the opportunity to share our work with a Philly audience.


UR MINES
Director Jeff Lucky
Possibly, Maybe Shorts Program
Saturday, Aug. 4, 12:00 noon
United States, 2018, 6 min.
US Premiere
On a single day in London, a jaded saxophone player and a frustrated photographer make a seemingly random connection as they bond over their common artistic and personal struggles.
I gave each filmmaker the choice of writing their responses to the 5 questions or creating a video to answer. So happy to present the first video! Jeff did a perfect job answering on camera in an awesome t-shirt!




BLOOD RUNS DOWN
Director Zandashe Brown
Haint Business Shorts Program
Sunday August 5th 11:45am
United States, 2018, 18 min. East Coast Premiere
It’s the night before Ana’s fifth birthday and Elize wants to make sure all is in order to give her daughter the best celebration yet. Consistently weary from the never-ending job of single motherhood with no outlets for her own care, Elize searches for a place for her own peace and vulnerability. When Elize undergoes a frightening transition, Ana must decide between saving her mother or protecting herself in this haunting account of inheritance, daughterhood, and demons.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Zandashe Brown: BLOOD RUNS DOWN is a deeply personal film, based mostly on my own experience living with a mother who was in the midst of a mental breakdown. On a larger scale, it's a story about generational trauma amongst Black women and girls, and the connection of that trauma to... well, I'll let you watch the film and see.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Zandashe Brown: I like to think I shine when I get to the script analysis. Communication is very important to me as a filmmaker, and the challenge of directing has made me a better communicator in real life. I really enjoy breaking down words and scenes - even if they're ones I've written, especially then - and expanding the subtext and motives and everything else behind the words into a larger universe. Then when I can bring that universe to the actors, have them expand it even more and explore the possibilities, I truly feel like I've started the process of creating something beautiful.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Zandashe Brown: I owe so much thanks to my mentor and producer Lauren Domino who really led me through the process of making my first real film (and encouraging me to submit to BlackStar!) I also have to give a very special thanks to my production designer Jesse Ray Guillory and co-producer Alexis Clark. The three of us spent many nights and days together crafting Blood Runs Down with very few resources. I'm thankful for what our friendship created.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Zandashe Brown:We’re a group of Louisianians so food is everything. All the time. Because we shot through the night and were already tired, we tried to make sure our meals and craft were light and boosted our energy. That can be a challenge when you’re in New Orleans surrounded by foods covered in all kinds of gravy, sauces, and ettouffee. It’s not that healthy options aren’t available to us, it’s just sometimes tricky to choose a veggie platter and hummus over a warm bowl of gumbo that someone’s mom could have thrown together. Thankfully, we all wanted to stay awake and made good choices. Plus, it’s Louisiana so... we're always gonna eat good.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Zandashe Brown: BlackStar will be my first experience screening a film outside of Louisiana so this is huge for me! It especially means a lot to screen for the first time at a festival that centers Black narratives and filmmakers. BLOOD RUNS DOWN is a film made for and largely by Black women. I trust that this very personal yet universal story will be warmly welcomed and honored by this community and I look forward to meeting so many other filmmakers with beautiful visions!

PARIS BLUES IN HARLEM
Director Nadhege Ptah
Family Matters Shorts Program
Thursday, August 2nd 11am
United States, 2018, 14 min. 
East Coast Premiere
Paris Blues in Harlem is the story of a young woman, Paris, and her attempts to save her grandfather’s insolvent Harlem jazz nightclub. Paris has a few hours to convince her rigid elder to accept a real estate agent’s briefcase with mounds of cash in exchange for his nightclub. But, as time runs out, he struggles to let go. With only a few seconds left, Paris is faced with a choice between legacy and money.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Nadhege Ptah:My inspiration was in preserving the legacy of Paris Blues - a Harlem Jazz club owned and operated by Samuel Hargress since 1969, and has such a rich history. Gentrification and the shift in Harlem made it pertinent to capture this old Harlem legacy through film; particularly while the elders are alive to share stories while it still exists.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Nadhege Ptah: I shine on being truthful and genuine and encouraged my creative team to shine on their truth and talents to bring the story towards fruition. The process is really organic by meeting the creative team, discussing my goals, intentions and hearing their input on how to enhance it. I'm a stickler for meticulous preparation and creating a family atmosphere where respect and fun are in the mix so we can get out of our own way and let the artistic process shine and be the main focus.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Nadhege Ptah: So many people to name. Okay, let me name a few which are the: Producing Team ( Michele Baldwin/Actress, Lisa Durden, Frances Lozada) Executive Producers: Samuel Hargress, ideacoli, Actors: Charles Weldon, Tonya Pinkins, C. Truth, Arthur French, Doctor Bob Lee, Iris Gale, Set Decorator: Fabiola Didier, Set Design Assistant: Dawn Patterson, Director of Photography: Snyder Derival, Editor: Gaudens Zulu, Music Composer: Jeff Joseph Jeudy, Costume Design: Yvette P. Joseph, Makeup Artist: Felicia Graham, Hair: Alethea X. Graham and countless more.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Nadhege Ptah: Food is a huge component of filmmaking for me. If we don't feed the soul how can we expect them to do their best work? Also, I'm huge on healthy and meeting diverse palettes. I Iove to eat healthy and delicious food. I love to eat. I do my best on sustaining healthy options. Hence, for low budget films, it's a challenge. So, my producer Michele and I are very creative in constructing a meal plan that's not costly and healthy. I have cooked large meals myself for my past two productions with leftovers remaining. Vegetarian Chili, brown rice, baked barbecue wings, stir-fried vegetables Asian noodles, rice and peas, salad, Hisbicus punch juice, pasta salad, etc. Also, I've had restaurants sponsor food for private screenings, production and utilize the catered meal in the some of the scenes.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Nadhege Ptah: A huge honor. I have attended many years ago with friends and I was impressed with the selection of films and the overall atmosphere of the festival. So, screening at the Black Star Film Festival feels like I've gain access and I'm a part of a community of innovative storytellers.

XIN (Heart)
Director Desha Dauchan
Haint Business Shorts Program
Sun Aug. 5th 11:45am
United States, 2017, 12 min.
East Coast Premiere
Xin (“heart”, in Mandarin) is the story of a woman haunted by the ghost of her mother after having been her caregiver and watching her succumb to Atypical Parkinson’s Disease. With the help of her therapist, she tries to gain clarity on the nature of the hauntings.
tinahuang.com
We get the filmmaking team on this one!

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Tina Huang (Writer/Co-producer/Actor): Firstly, this story grew out of my own struggle with grief: in 2014 my mother passed away after suffering from a degenerative disease. I had been her caregiver. I hoped I would move linearly through the known "five stages of grief." What I found was that grief is not linear; I often traversed backward and forward and got knocked sideways. I had nightmares, day dreams and thought I could still sense my mother's presence. I felt crazy and alone. I found some help in therapy and began to write. Secondly, my community rallied behind me. My loved ones and closest friends, especially my producing partner, Karla Mosley, encouraged me to write through the grieving process. I was hesitant to share my personal experience and cried a lot while writing. Surprisingly, at the screenings we've had, the film has resonated with people who have also experienced profound loss and numerous people have approached me after to share their own stories. I feel honored that people feel connected to our film and to the imagery. I realized that sharing my experience, a universal human experience, has a true healing power and my feelings of isolation have been shattered. Finally, I am first generation Taiwanese American and my stoic, immigrant parents didn't raise me to celebrate or express my emotions. In my life, I haven't seen many faces like my own on the big screen. I thought it was important to make a film with people of color. We need to see our stories represented. Because Xin is such a personal story, I needed a director with the sensitivity, vision and intelligence to tell a universal story and Desha was the right person.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Desha Dauchan (Director): I dive in to know and feel the heart of the story and allow it to guide my attention to detail at every step of the process. For Xin, we began with such a well-written and heartfelt script. Collaborating with Tina, the producer, actress and writer felt so organic. We found such easy common ground so often, knowing we were peeling back the layers of Elaine’s grief to uncover the source of her own personal haunting. All of that guided my directorial choices as I worked with my team of creative collaborators…from holding a very still restricted frame compositionally and giving way to movement as the character’s stagnancy begins to break a bit…to holding back on the triumphant feel of the drums in the score until it was earned in Elaine’s evolution…to encouraging my actors and then stepping out of their way for their incredibly connected performances. For me, knowing the heart of the journey drives the guiding and texturing of what we are creating.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Tina Huang (Writer/Co-producer/Actor): This project could not have been done without my producing partner, Karla Mosley who Co-founded 1:1 Productions with me. Our mission is to champion women of color in front of and behind the camera. Not only did she encourage me through the tough writing process, she is an incredible co-producer and co-star. We would like to give a shout out to Desha Dauchan, director, Felecia Hunter, producer, Chris Low, director of photography, Romina Rey, editor, our amazing cast, CiCi Lau and Jim Lau, and to all of our amazing crew. We would also like to give a HUGE thanks to all of our donors whose financial support made this entire project come to life. BIG love to our family and friends who supported us through to the end.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Tina Huang:Food does not play a role in our film but Craft services does! Since so many of our crew are originally from the East coast, we made sure to get a large tub of Twizzlers and everyone was happy with that! Down with Red Vines!

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Desha Dauchan: I so admire Blackstar Film Festival’s bold commitment to a richly curated program highlighting storytellers from the diaspora. I am grateful to be back and we are honored to be apart of this community of filmmakers.

Tina Huang:I ditto Desha's answer. I respect the work BlackStar is doing in supporting and lifting up underrepresented stories. I feel absolutely honored to be a part of this festival and extremely grateful to be in this community of filmmakers as well. I cannot wait to share XIN (Heart) with BlackStar's audiences.

FAMILY of TOO MANY (فامیل زیادی)
Director Maaman Rezaee
Family Matters Shorts Program
Thurs, Aug 2nd 11am
Iran, Islamic Republic of
2017, 14 min.
World Premiere
Bahar, an 8-year-old Iranian girl, believes she has caused the death of her grandmother. As she deals with her feelings of guilt, her parents decide to steal the grandmother’s body. As Baha’is living in Shi’a Iran, the family risks everything when they spirit the body away in the middle of the night so that they can perform their prohibited religious rituals.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Maaman Rezaee: The film is about a persecuted religious minority in Iran, one that I grew up in, and their struggle with obtaining the most basic rights, like that of burial rituals. I have heard similar stories growing up and they've always moved me.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Maaman Rezaee:I really enjoy collaborating with others and how the end film is never what you pictured in the beginning but is a result of the creative energy everyone brings to the table, whether it’s a constructive energy or not. It’s as if the film takes a life of its own. As someone who also spends a lot of time writing, and usually in solitude, this collaboration is what I’m looking forward to as I go through other phases.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Maaman Rezaee:So Many people were involved in the making of this film. As it states in the credits, many of these individuals, whether working on the crew or supporting us financially, didn’t want their names to be mentioned in the credits due to concerns for their safety. This film was challenging in so many ways, both in preproduction and production, and it wouldn’t have been possible without the support of everyone involved, credited or not.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Maaman Rezaee: We had Persian food on one of the production days. And I don’t know about anyone else on set, but I remember enjoying the food that day on a different level. As if the flavors and smells took me back to Iran, where the story comes from.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Maaman Rezaee:This is my first time attending Backstar Film Festival but I’m beyond excited to have the film premiere in my current city and at this festival. It seems to bring the community together under the same values of telling stories that matter and of people that are rarely represented in mainstream cinema. And that’s the exact image I had in mind while creating Family of Too Many.

NIGHTS OF AUTUMN
Director Majestic Tillman
Here On Out Shorts Program
Sunday, Aug. 5, 2:30 PM

United States, 2018, 13 min.
World Premiere
When Cameron returns to his childhood home to visit his sister Mira, he is confronted by his stepfather Marcus, forcing him to confront his tumultuous family history.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Majestic Tillman:My main inspiration for my film was an idea I got wondering what lengths I would go to to protect my little brother.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Majestic Tillman:I mostly focus on acting and screenwriting But for this project I chose to direct it as well. Where I’m strongest at in my directing is how I can relate to an actor and explain the reasons behind where their character is going what they are doing.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Majestic Tillman: I would like to shoutout RougeFX for helping me to film this project.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Majestic Tillman:We had craft services from a local cook named Deirdre Kelly who cooked for us on our night shoot.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Majestic Tillman:For me it’s a form of recognition from my people who are trying to make it in the same field I’m in, and it’s exciting to know that people take my art serious.

BLACK LIGHT
Director Justice Singleton
Here On Out Shorts Program
Sun. Aug. 5th 2:30pm
United States, 2017, 11 min.
This film, set in Los Angeles, is about Kasim Jordan, a skateboarder and aspiring filmmaker who, after getting kicked out of his home, begins to explore Hollywood and the dangers his mother has warned him about.

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Justice Singleton:My inspiration for my film still is Trayvon Martin’s death and the results from it. I felt the need to respond to the madness by writing a feature film. When executive wanted know how my film would look I ended up directing this short first. Ultimately, the main inspiration was really being drawn in by the pain and anger of how mothers feel when they lose their children. In response their children become heroes and martyr for a vast movement.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Justice Singleton: I feel I shine as a filmmaker because I see the whole picture. I’ve been in various positions on and off set since I was young. I understand the whole entire process and the humility and care needed to collaborate with others. Directing has taught me compassion and patience. My greatest gift is having a talent for fine details. Finding a shot or frame or moment that’s very unique and touches an audience.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Justice Singleton: So many people uplifted Black Light such as my Director of Photography Laterrian McIntosh, costume designer Sami Martin Sarmiento, my talented actors Elijah Reed and Lola Albright. Of course, my parents, specifically my mom who nurtures a lot of my ideas!

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Justice Singleton:  I eat a lot of junk onset, anything with hot sauce or something sweet involved! But for my people, had my grandpa make hot dogs or burgers. Really, if I want anything on set it’s soul food all the time!

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Justice Singleton: For my film to screen at this festival sincerely means a lot. I worked very hard to keep these ideas and dreams alive. To share BLACK LIGHT with others is a true blessing because I know we all share the same emotions and guilt involving black lives and how much they matter. This festival has always been known for being very black-centric and artsy, it’s cool to be apart of this BlackStar crew!

WHITE KNUCKLE
Director Xavier Coleman
Free RangeShorts Program
Saturday, Aug. 4th 10am
United States, 2018, 23 min.
When a serial killer begins targeting the gentrifiers of a dwindling, historically Black neighborhood, three young adults attempt to determine the murderer’s identity… before they’re next. TRAILER

1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Xavier Coleman: In 2014, I moved to the neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, New York. Once referred to as "Little Harlem,” Bedford-Stuyvesant is a historically black, working class community previously known for containing the highest concentration of black homeowners in the country.

When I finally arrived in Bedford-Stuyvesant, however, I noticed the extreme extent to which the Black community was being pushed out as a result of gentrification. And as the community was fading, so were the cultural elements and diversity which made the neighborhood so historically significant. I began to wonder what the cultural consequences of gentrification might mean for Brooklyn and cities like it around the world. This investigation ultimately led me to begin writing a horror film.

The horror genre, and the slasher subgenre in particular, has always been a powerful tool to explore and critique American suburbia and expose its hidden dangers. Thus, it seemed to be an ideal framework with which to unpack the repercussions of gentrification for by inverting the genre’s suburban tropes within an urban setting.

2. T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Xavier Coleman: Absolutely love writing dialogue, and its something I want to continue to hone as I move forward as an artist. In terms of directing, constructing a rhythmic storyboard with my DP, Connor, and then editing it into existence is also something that gives me a lot of life.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Xavier Coleman: Big shout out my core team, best friends and co-creators - A.D. Tess Raih, Cinematographer Connor Lawson, Producer Philip Champagne, Producer Miranda Kahn, and 2nd A.D. Miakoda Gale! Another shoutout to the mentors who have supported us: Monkeypaw Productions, Tonya Lewis Lee and Molly Conners.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Xavier Coleman: I utilized food as a cultural signifier and a tool of character development in White Knuckle. Considering the way businesses and consumption are such a benchmark of gentrification as they cater to specific demographics, it made sense to unpack some of our films themes via food and beverage. In terms of what specifically is portrayed - you'll need to see the film to find out!

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Xavier Coleman: Being at BlackStar means I'm following in the footsteps of some my favorite artists who have been associated with the festival in the past; people such as Arthur Jafa, Bradford Young and Ava DuVernay. And it means I'm moving alongside of the next wave of amazing filmmakers, of which there are too many that I admire to name. Being a part of BlackStar feels like I'm on the right path.

IN THE FIELD
Director Tesia Walker
Haint Business Shorts Program
August 5th 11:45am
United States, 2017, 14 min.
Philadelphia Premiere
In The Field follows an ambitious local reporter, John Landon, who witnesses a police-related shooting of a black girl outside a toy store on Christmas Eve. John is tasked with interviewing the girl’s family to get the scoop that will bring him national fame. However, he finds that getting the exclusive involves more than just being there first. TRAILER
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Tesia Walker: It's been a tense past several years in America. I wanted to make a statement along with the co-writer, Bobby Kruger. We wanted to add to the conversation of police and their relationship with the Black community. But we wanted to do it in a way that hasn't been seen before. So we decided to play with some aspects of horror and sprinkle it throughout the film. Because some of these tragedies that do happen are a bit horrific in a way.

2.T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Tesia Walker: I believe that stories pick their filmmakers, not the other way around. I am good at recognizing the stories that I should tell. I just feel it right in my core. On set, I love working with actors. I am totally a director's actor. It's a collaborative effort from script to screen. When an actor can give it that little special something, or add something in the moment that hasn't be thought of, it's like pure magic for me. 


3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Tesia Walker: I want to thank Bobby Kruger, EJ Argenio, and Ryan Daveport, for giving me the opportunity to tell this story with them. They saw my film, Search Party, and recognized that we shared the same creative vision. I am eternally grateful for my amazing cast for slaying it over long hours in the cold: Tyson, Sally, Bobby, Antonio, John, and Shaakirah. Everyone from the camera team, editing, art department, the grips and gaffers, wardrobe, sound, locations, transportation, my AD, and production assistants--you are amazing!!!!

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Tesia Walker: You can always expect someone to be holding a cup or eating a snack at some point in my film. We had on camera snacks in one of the shots, but I am pretty sure at some point I started munching on those because waiting and eating go together on a film shoot. 


5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Tesia Walker: I am really honored, especially because I have heard such great compliments from other filmmakers about Blackstar. Very excited to be a part of this dynamic festival!



FALLOU
Dir. Alassane Sy
When Worlds Collide Shorts Program
England, Senegal, 2017, 31 min
East Coast Premiere

Fallou is the story of a young man who has been sent from Senegal to London by a marabout linked to an extremist group. Fallou will discover London’s energy, music and people. He will make new friends and eventually make a choice: stay faithful to his marabout or embrace the exciting life of this new city.
1. T&T: In a nutshell what was the main inspiration for your film?

Alassane Sy: The confusion people have between Islam and terrorism. The many reasons why someone would want to join the dark side of extremism. These are the reasons why I wanted to bring an African perspective to this subject.

2.T&T: Where do you really shine as a filmmaker? Please expand upon directing to include the aspect of the directing process where you know you are most on point?

Alassane Sy:When I have a story in my mind and a script that is open enough to improvise and use what the environment has to offer, then I am happy and feel like I am really creating something, not just following what has already been written.

3. T&T: Give a quick shout out to your creative team and anyone who helped get your film from an idea to screening at BlackStar.

Alassane Sy: We shot this film with only £3000. So it required a not necessarily super experienced team, but a passionate and dedicated team. The list is long, but the entire cast and crew were just amazingly talented artists (singers, dancers and others) to make this happen. Without them, this film would never happen.

4. T&T: Does food play a part in your film? It can be something you like to eat on set, while editing, some great Craft Services, a scene involving food or a restaurant/bar/coffee shop.

Alassane Sy: Thieboudiene (favourite Senegalese dish), made by one of the main actors of the film, Khadime Manè (Badou in the film), was the secret of this whole shooting process.

5. T&T: What does it mean to you to screen your film at the 7th Annual BlackStar Film Festival?

Alassane Sy: I think just the name”Blackstars” is enough for any black filmmakers to feel like they are at the right place. With a film or without, I would be happy to assist or contribute in somehow to this great initiative.


In preparation for #Blackstar18, I sent these interview questions to many of the filmmakers screening short films, because it seemed to me since their work is shown in blocks, it would be nice to highlight each individual director and/or writer. However, that doesn't mean I can't give some love and attention to a filmmaker debuting his first feature length film - Menelek Lumumba's film "1 Angry Black Man" had its World Premiere in Philadelphia during #BlackStar18
CHECK OUT HIS 5 QUESTION INTERVIEW


 



BLACKSTAR FILM FESTIVAL 2018 AWARD WINNERS

JURIED AWARDS

Best Feature Documentary

Douvan Jou Ka Leve (Gessica Généus)

Best Narrative Feature

Jinn (Nijila Mu’min)

Best Short Documentary

Nuuca (Michelle Latimer)

Best Short Narrative

Where the Water Runs (Dubois N. Ashong)

Best Experimental Film

Fucked Like a Star (Stefani Saintonge)

Best Youth Film (Ages 11-18)

blu blak (King Ali Emeka)

Best Youth Film (Ages 19-22)

I Have Something to Tell You (Tshireletso Phalatse, Kagiso Baloyi, Rethabile Milisi)

21st Century Global Inclusion Awards for Emerging Voices: Narrative

War Paint (Katrelle Kindred)

21st Century Global Inclusion Awards for Emerging Voices: Documentary

Birth of Afrobeat (Opiyo Okeyo)

AUDIENCE AWARDS

Favorite Experimental Film: Fucked Like a Star (Stefani Saintonge)

Favorite Documentary Feature: The Feeling of Being Watched (Assia Boundaoui)

Favorite Narrative Feature: Jinn (Nijila Mu’min)

Favorite Documentary Short: Black 14 (Darius Clark Monroe)

Favorite Narrative Short: Where the Water Runs (Dubois N. Ashong)

Favorite Youth Film (11-18): Beyond My Skin (Aniya Wolf)

Favorite Youth Film (19-22): Hot and Bothered (Leah Byrd)



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Featured Post

26th Annual PHILADELPHIA FILM FESTIVAL Coverage (Oct 19-29, 2017)

Tinsel & Tine's Look at : The 26th Annual PHILADELPHIA Film Festival By Le Anne Lindsay, Editor POST UPDATE 11/1/2018:  ...

Food n Film: BURNT

Food n Film: BURNT
Bradley Cooper has more than charisma, he has an over abundance of Chi, which radiates out from him; so for me, this role as temperamental and damaged chef Adam Jones, who also inspires great love and admiration from those around him, works on the level of characterization. In fact, I think he's among a very short list of actors who would be able to pull off being so self-involved and yet likable. Doesn't hurt that he really speaks French too! READ POST

Food n Film: CHEF

Food n Film: CHEF
Much of the movie centers around the father/son relationship, and how much they learn from each other. But the real star of the film is all the food preparation, every other scene made me groan with want of everything up on that screen! Particularly the perfectly roasted and rubbed brisket, the crispy fat of the pork belly, sizzling bacon and the much ballyhooed Chocolate Lava Cake. READ POST

CITY OF GOLD

CITY OF GOLD
The key to deciphering both the city it beautifully depicts and the man who eats it best - City of Gold


By Tinsel & Tine Contributor Denine Gorniak (The Bicycle-Chef)

What Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times food critic/writer, has done for food writing journalism and for the restaurants that he loves, the movie, City of Gold has done for Jonathan Gold and Los Angeles and its surrounding environs – it has planted taco covered kisses on them... READ POST

Food n Film: CHOCOLAT

Food n Film: CHOCOLAT
If you’re a foodie movie lover who saw Lasse Hallström’s The Hundred Foot Journey (see T&T post), this summer you may be wondering what delicious visual journey might be awaiting you in the theater next. Well, how about a look back at his film Chocolat (2000), which stars French actress Juliette Binoche, Judi Dench and Johnny Depp. Hallström’s has a special talent for turning cooking into a dramatic movie journey...READ MORE

Food n Film: THE HUNDRED FOOT JOURNEY

...young Hassan, a soulful-eyed boy with lush, thick eye lashes, places his face into the sea urchin basket, and breathes in the exotic briny scent. He sticks his fingers into the aquatic ooze, takes it to his mouth and is transfixed by the taste. The vendor, oblivious to the thrusting arms of frenzied women, notices the boy and realizes he is the only one worthy of this oceanic prize; he is the one who can “truly taste.” ... READ MORE

Food n Film: JULIE & JULIA

Food n Film: JULIE & JULIA
Personally, I like the unevenness of it, because I fell in love with the post World War II, Parisian sights, sounds, food and romance between Julia and Paul. I always felt a bit jarred back into reality when the scenes returned to Julie's meltdowns and cramped kitchen.READ POST

Food n Film: EAT PRAY LOVE

Food n Film: EAT PRAY LOVE
Six months into my 38th year of this life, I had my first panic attack. I didn't know that's what it was until months later. Symptom after symptom starting piling up on me until there were days I could no longer move my arms or neck. The doctors told me I was suffering from an auto-immune condition that they felt was most likely Lupus. And so began my much deeper journey and exploration into the world of spirit, alternative medicine, yoga, meditation and Eat, Pray, Love. READ POST

Food n Film: TODAY'S SPECIAL

Food n Film: TODAY'S SPECIAL
With a film like this, food plays a main character in the story and I was lucky enough to get an interview with the film's Food Stylist, Janine Kalesis.READ POST

Food n Film: WAITRESS

Food n Film: WAITRESS
In this 2007 film, Keri Russell stars as Jenna - a desolate diner waitress seeking solace in the art of pie-making. Trapped in an unhappy marriage, she’s eager to escape her husband and her small-town hell and sets about to make a run for it by entering an out of town pie baking contest. READ POST

Food n Film: BABETTE'S FEAST

Food n Film: BABETTE'S FEAST
Those of us in attendance were not only given the opportunity to see Babette's Feast, the Oscar winning, Danish film, considered one of the all-time great "food films"; we also got to taste Babette's menu! READ POST

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15 Top Food in Film Flicks

15 Top Food in Film Flicks
Cozy Quilt of Food Movies, we'll add more patches as T &T discovers more films where food plays the biggest "roll"

Tinsel & Tine on Paper.li

Tinsel & Tine on Paper.li
Really love this platform, you feature your stuff and other people's stuff you follow, and it all configures like the front page of a newspaper. Click to see what I mean

Visit Our YouTube Channel

Visit Our YouTube Channel
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Philly Food and Film

Videographer Oliver Gallini 5 min short featuring organic-chemist-turned-chef, Townsend Wentz, who got his start at The Four Seasons Philadelphia.

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About This Blog

is about discovering what I find pleasing in screening & eating - in case you missed it, the name is a play on Tinseltown using the Tines of a Fork.

Feel free to send me info on a film or new restaurant you'd like me to highlight.
-tinseltine@gmail.com


Will there ever be a cap on movie prices?

Will we one day pay $20 a pop?

Why don't we pay on a scale?

A crap movie like everything Adam Sandler has ever done should cost about $4.50.
Big action movies like"Lord of the Rings", "Iron Man," "Transformers" are worth $10.
Woody Allen movie or something like "Silver Linings Playbook" $6-$7.
A chick flick or light comedy $5.75 and most Indie Films $5.25.

You could even do it by seasons - all summer block busters from May to August - $10
Sept - November 15th $3.50 - $4
Back to $10 for Thanksgiving and Christmas etc...

Or you can do it by A Actors ($9 - $10), B Actors ($6 - $7) TV actors on the big screen ($3.50 - $4)

Surely I'm not the first person to realize this makes sense. Has it been voted on in the Motion Picture Industry and then vetoed? If so, why?

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